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Snowboard boot separation axiety


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I have several sets of "Switch Type" snowboarding boots that I Cannot find replacements for, diligently try as I might.

I need to know what are my option to repair this type of issue.

http://imgur.com/2DTQieL

What are the adhesives that can be used to hold the fabric part of a boot to the sole of a boot that has separated ?

This is a fairly “special case”, as it is literally structural ! Not just holding the two parts together.

The sole must be structurally bonded to the boot, as the stresses developed are trying to pull the two apart with as much force as a normal person can developed. More really, as the torque applied with the leverage of the snowboard can multiply the stresses.

These have a binding system that attaches the sole to a snowboard directly, with NO “traditional” strap binding system.

Similar to this for those unaware
http://static.evo.com/content/kbis/boot_10.jpg

These "Switch" type boots clip to a Switch binding system, like this:



And thus require strength of the sole bonded to the boot!

Is there a material or adhesive out there and available that would be recommended to structurally bond a boot to the sole?

Is there any information or details I can share to get help and advice?

http://imgur.com/1EpHGun

http://imgur.com/2DTQieL

http://imgur.com/4JM20hV

IMG_3131.jpg

IMG_3132.jpg

IMG_3133.jpg

IMG_3134.jpg

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what you need is someone on here that can do the repair - I think nobody is going to tell you how to do it because it may not be done correctly and I suppose they could be tracked and sued.

and

would you ask a dentist how to fill a tooth?

or 

a Doctor how to remove appendix?

 

Im sure someone here can do the job for you - they are magic elves.

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Just finding someone to discus it with is an achievement.

 

I have been turned away by all my local specialty mountain footwear repair options. Nor found any good advice asking around.

 

I have taken them to many local shops specifically for mountain wear and snow sports repair, specifically for boots and foot wear, no one seems to want to help me.

 

If anyone has a reliable recommendation for the PNW, specifically Portland Oregon area, I would love to talk to someone local to be able to develop a relationship. Lost my favorite local shop, and still reeling from the loss.

 

 

what you need is someone on here that can do the repair - I think nobody is going to tell you how to do it because it may not be done correctly and I suppose they could be tracked and sued.

and

would you ask a dentist how to fill a tooth?

or 

a Doctor how to remove appendix?

 

Im sure someone here can do the job for you - they are magic elves.

 

 

While I absolutely agree with you, I would really LOVE to talk about what will be required to do this job properly and reliably. Its possible they understand something or have seen something I am not considering ?

 

 

Assuming I cannot find someone willing to help me, on the spectrum of people capable of doing a acceptable job with tutelage, I think I am up there. I am willing to devote time and effort to do a very good job if it comes to it. I am very passionate about these, they are an integral part of the whole experience for me.

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You would need to be able to identify the exact material you are working with, (not easy to do, especially from a picture)

You would need to use the correct adhesive (not easy to advise)

You would need the use of a press.

But they have come away for a reason, you would need to find out why they have come away in the first instance

and rectify the problem, otherwise it would be a waste of time just sticking them back.

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the reason they have come away is quite simple the vinyl coating has come aw from the fabric backing ,this is common with most of this style of shoe in order to do it you would have to remove thee sole unit completly and clean the vinyl residue off it then seal the fabric before gluing 

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You would need to be able to identify the exact material you are working with, (not easy to do, especially from a picture)

You would need to use the correct adhesive (not easy to advise)

You would need the use of a press.

But they have come away for a reason, you would need to find out why they have come away in the first instance

and rectify the problem, otherwise it would be a waste of time just sticking them back.

 

Thats exactly the things I am considering.

 

I just dont have experience with these materials, and I have one shot to do it correctly.

 

Without being confident of exactly what I am doing, and why, I dont think this will ever turn out with the results I desire.

 

As modestly as is possible, I put these things through stresses that I need to trust them implicitly.

 

While I would LOVE to find a new fresh replacement, this is NOT possible.

 

I am stuck looking at options to repair in the best way that is possible.

 

I am willing to do what it takes!

 

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>You would need to be able to identify the exact material you are working with, (not easy to do, especially from a picture)

 

I would love any assistance ad advice how to go about validating exactly what materials I am dealing with.

 

>You would need to use the correct adhesive (not easy to advise)

 

Having a list of plausible candidates to research for compatibility would be magnificent.

 

>You would need the use of a press.

 

Have it, and can build/adapt any parts needed to accommodate. 

 

Was also initialy thinking, but not sure if it would be OK to employ vacuum bagging the sidewalls to hold the peripheral ridges together equally as well for a nice tight even conectiion , could even use pressurized bags to press the sidewalls together as well if it needs air to cure. Bagging seemed like a easy solution though.

 

>But they have come away for a reason, you would need to find out why they have come away in the first instance

and rectify the problem, otherwise it would be a waste of time just sticking them back.

 

Absolutely, and thats what scares me !

 

I think it is age, and I have been told about polyurethane foam rot, which is supposedly endemic to these types of items?

 

As ambitious as it sounds, I would be willing to model, create disposable printed molds, and recast the soles if that were even plausible?

 

 

These really mean that much to me.

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the reason they have come away is quite simple the vinyl coating has come aw from the fabric backing ,this is common with most of this style of shoe in order to do it you would have to remove thee sole unit completly and clean the vinyl residue off it then seal the fabric before gluing 

 

If that is what is required, then that is easily manageable.

 

The biggest issue in my mind is finding the correct material to bond reliably with the stresses developed on the materials.

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"As modestly as is possible, I put these things through stresses that I need to trust them implicitly"

 

This is the part that bothers me, and probably every repairer you have visited. If a sole falls off a conventional boot it's not a disaster, just an inconvenience (and an embarrassment for whoever put it on). If the sole falls off these boots, it's a broken leg or worse.

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I doubt it if the midsole is breaking up like some do.

The set I am most concerned with Does have this issue sadly.

 

I think it is a polyurethane foam on this black set, which I have been told is endemic to these materials to rot/fail over time?

 

The set of boots I posted are the most ideal “simple” realistic example I felt comfortable posting and asking for advice on.

 

 

My thought is to work out from the simplest solutions to the more difficult solutions.

IMG_3218.jpg

IMG_3224.jpg

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"As modestly as is possible, I put these things through stresses that I need to trust them implicitly"

 

This is the part that bothers me, and probably every repairer you have visited. If a sole falls off a conventional boot it's not a disaster, just an inconvenience (and an embarrassment for whoever put it on). If the sole falls off these boots, it's a broken leg or worse.

 

Your concerns are real, I literally love these things so much as to accept the risks.

 

I think monitoring them closely should be sufficient to know what will happen.

 

 

They wont fail catastrophically, so keeping tabs on them should allow me to experiment and see what can be done.

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If they are suffering from "polyurethane foam rot" i.e. breaking up, you will need to get rid of all the polyurethane

and replace it with a more suitable material, not a job for the faint hearted.

 

I am up to the task, even if it takes some time.

 

I have multiple sets of these things, been planning for the inevitable for a long time.

 

Just none of these suit me as well as this Black set I posted above.

 

If its possible, I could easily model, and print out casts to replace the failing foam of the Black set.

 

Its been in my mind for a long time, I feel like its time to move forward with a solution if it comes to it.

 

If its possible to shore up the existing structure I would like to explore that first, but if required, I think I am fully capable to do what is necessary, and more importantly willing to do it.

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Mcnett Freesole or Bison Marathon will possibly stick i

I have used this Freesole product before, to protect the stitching, but it seems to have come away from the material on this Black set, and while I am under no authority to say one way or the other , it seems not quite the correct solution from my limited experiences with it, seems a little too ridged, as well as the lackluster bonding on the exact material it is intended to hold together, but perhaps I did not prep it or apply it correctly? 

IMG_3225.jpg

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The glue will have to support an adults bodyweight in freezing temperatures.

 

Exactly !

 

Many materials start to loose thier advantageous properties at elevated and reduced temperatures, so this is a important consideration to consider, and one I would love assistance with from experienced people if at all possible. 

 

I have noticed my freesole has been fairly resilient, however, the low temperature seems to change its durability.

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