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What Screws To Use For Outdoors Slate Sign


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I have engraved my first slate door number. I went to a local specialist fixings supplier and showed him the piece of slate and asked for some suitable screws. However, my client has contacted me to say that the screws have started to rust. (photo attached) Can anyone suggest what screws I should use for outdoors?

Slate Door No 72.JPG

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Thanks Mick, I thought that brass was too soft to use on a wall. (Please correct me if I am wrong.)  My client felt that the stainless steel screws would show up too much against the slate. I had assumed that the black coating on the screws would prevent the rush.

 

I have had a look at the Screwfix web site. In the Masonry Srews section there is 

 

DEWALT COUNTERSUNK TAPPER+ CONCRETE SCREW 6.3 X 45MM 100 PACK - “One-piece self-tapping concrete screws with corrosion-resistant perma-seal coating. Features a gimlet drill point for wood meaning that no pre-drilling is required. For use in a variety of light to medium duty applications including screen enclosures, exterior metal lighting, storm shutters and marine environments. Suitable for base materials including concrete, masonry and wood.”

 

The colour is described as Blue. Has anyone tried these? What do they look like with slate? Do they stay rust free?

 

I would be interested hear what experience you all have had in supplying slate signs and what advice you give your customers regarding how to fix them to walls. 

 
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As far as I know the concrete screws have to be put in with a rotary perrcussion tool, (forgotten the name) I have one but as far as it goes have never managed to fix with it....

The screw cuprs look tacky I think and more for contiboard furniture. But may work 

This is what I used some time ago and they looked good for ages, then I  moved away

https://www.accu.co.uk/en/pozi-ab-self-tapping-pan-screws/163949-SPPT-No-7-2-A2-BL

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I have engraved my first slate door number. I went to a local specialist fixings supplier and showed him the piece of slate and asked for some suitable screws. However, my client has contacted me to say that the screws have started to rust. (photo attached) Can anyone suggest what screws I should use for outdoors?

What machine did you use Mick
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Hi Chris,

 

If your customer does not like chrome then use brass screws and age them by using antiquing fluid or brass black (antiquing fluid is far better as it gives a more natural appearance - you can usually get this from a craft/art suppliers or Gravograph and Mastergrave), clean the head of each screw carefully using 1500 wet & dry (or finer!) and if using countersunk screws then do this by laying the paper on a flat surface and carefully drawing the head across the paper until a uniform polish without any blemishes is acheived.  Make sure to clean inside the slot also otherwise antiquing fluid won't take.   Dip each screw head into brass blacking or antiquing fluid to acheive desired colour.  Rinse off, dry and away you go.

 

Take a fine paint brush and a little fluid with you when you fix the plate, to touch up any 'bright spots' caused by the screwdriver.

 

Word of caution... when buying brass screws, take a magnet with you to test.  I have been caught before by companies passing off brass plated steel screws as solid brass!

 

Alternatively,  send me the screws and I will antique them for you.  Drop me an email via my website (brightonengravers.com) and I will tell you where to send them.

 

 

Handlebars Andy

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Hi Chris,

 

If your customer does not like chrome then use brass screws and age them by using antiquing fluid or brass black (antiquing fluid is far better as it gives a more natural appearance - you can usually get this from a craft/art suppliers or Gravograph and Mastergrave), clean the head of each screw carefully using 1500 wet & dry (or finer!) and if using countersunk screws then do this by laying the paper on a flat surface and carefully drawing the head across the paper until a uniform polish without any blemishes is acheived.  Make sure to clean inside the slot also otherwise antiquing fluid won't take.   Dip each screw head into brass blacking or antiquing fluid to acheive desired colour.  Rinse off, dry and away you go.

 

Take a fine paint brush and a little fluid with you when you fix the plate, to touch up any 'bright spots' caused by the screwdriver.

 

Word of caution... when buying brass screws, take a magnet with you to test.  I have been caught before by companies passing off brass plated steel screws as solid brass!

 

Alternatively,  send me the screws and I will antique them for you.  Drop me an email via my website (brightonengravers.com) and I will tell you where to send them.

 

 

Handlebars Andy

 

Brilliant response. Thank you very much for taking the time to reply Andy. This is really helpful.

Chris

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