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Stiletto heel drill out - tutorial


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Stiletto heel drill out tutorial

 

I'm not trying to teach you how to suck eggs with this one, But it might make some of you think about your own practices & give those with less experience a way of doing the job!

 

First of all its important to remember what it is we are doing here! We are not drilling a hole into a piece of wood for a DIY project at home!

We are handling a customers footwear, quite often in front of them during a process they are watching!

 

Its important to get things right, your image & reputation are being observed!

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Tools required

 

Goggles

Glove

Hammer

Centre punch

Drill bits

Drill

Cup of water.

 

The tools for the job are more important than you would first think! Remember your health & safety not only do good Health & safety practices reduce risks to you they give a professional image & inspire confidence to the customer.

 

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Wear goggles when drilling & I always wear a thick leather glove on the hand I am handling the shoes with, just in case the drive does break. Nothing looks worse than a repairer hoping about! Make sure you only use this glove for this job! You don’t want to be handling a nice beige designer shoe with a grubby old glove.

 

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Your drill bits should be given some consideration also, don’t go using a HSS bit (right), at the first sign of stress is will shatter (break) spending a little more on a bit can save a considerable amount of heart ache later! I use Cobalt drill bits (left) & swear by them!

 

Your drill is a very over looked sum in the equation when it come to drilling out a stiletto! The recommended drill speed for a 2.5mm drill is 3000 rpm. Its surprising how few drills on the shelves of your local B&Q run at this pace! A slower drill is fine for drilling a hole in a cabinet at home but for our purposes drill speed is important to reducing heat!

 

A cordless drill typically has a maximum RPM of about 1500 & your average corded drill will run at about 2500rpm. Check the speeds, I recently brought a Bosch drill with a maximum speed of 3000rpm for under £50 so it doesn’t break the bank getting the right equipment!

 

A cup of CLEAN water should be on hand to keep the heel block plastic cool during the process.

 

So how’s it done? Well first of all level the worn heel & tube.

 

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Secondly centre punch the old heel pin. This will stop the drill bit running off the top. Sometime this will push the pin down the tube a mm or two which helps guide the drill bit on its way.

 

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Now drill consistently in small amounts down the tube. You are watching for smoke, & the plastic heel block sizzling or melting. With experience you will know when this is about to happen & cool the work in your cup of water before continuing. Continue to drill until you have removed the pin.

 

Skim & heel as normal.

 

I have made a video to accompany this tutorial, which can be found at

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=t0JpRPObw ... annel_page

 

Lee

 

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I used to use a pillar stand & YES it is easier! & more controlled I totally agree with that!, but the old drill packed up the stand went in the bin & I couldn't get one to fit a faster drill, good advice Danny.

 

I don't like putting a stirup round the shoes uppers. The Key is to let the drill do the work, if your not pushing to hard you ain't going to have an accident that the glove can't cope with.

 

Recommended drill size for a 120. is 2.5mm

 

Lee

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You have to apply pressure, and when that drill breaks its impossible to stop going forward... A jagged broken drill spinning at 3000 rpm would easily pierce a glove.

A stirup is one of the best tools I own, couldn't be without one.

 

Funny how we are all different, we all do things a different way, I don't even own a stirup. I have had drills break, who hasn't but thankfully to date I haven't drawn blood. Danny's solution is the way to go in all honesty.

The point is though, that if done considerately, with the correct Drill, Bit & cooling then accidents are few & far between.

I can't remember the last time I had a drill snap & I've NEVER melted a heel block.

 

Lee

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smaller the drill the faster the speed, to reduce friction. Simple law of engineering.

 

i drill alot slower and use cutting lube,, never need to dip the shoe in water.,..
No, but you need to splat lube all over! But I guess your used to that! :lol:
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Drill in a Stand or Styrup, hand held is asking for a drilled hand, as Planet says, you have no control once the bit breaks.

There are many dangers on the Safety side of Drilling and it is best to minimise the risk.

Styrups themselves have a danger side in that the loop not being used hangs down at floor level, I once got caught in one in 1962 and tore a stomach muscle, learned to put the styrup up when not being used.

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Guest aracknid

I find cobalt drill-bits worse than useless. HSS bits are fine, regular cooling helps to temper the metal so the more it's used the better it gets. If the heel is very worn you can forget drilling altogether and cut through the tube on four sides with the edge of your scouring band -- the process is quick, invisible to the customer and far less likely to cause injury.

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Styrups themselves have a danger side in that the loop not being used hangs down at floor level, I once got caught in one in 1962 and tore a stomach muscle, learned to put the styrup up when not being used.

 

You can fall over just about anything if you leave it lying about after use. A tidy workshop is a safer workshop.

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I concour :D

 

I used to use HSS drills thta were regularly sharpened but have to admit to using the same method as Lee. Mind you, as with knives, you'll never break the drill if it's cutting, well almost. If the drill bits cutting then you need less pressure, it's when it's not that you apply more pressure and the drill breaks :?

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I find cobalt drill-bits worse than useless. HSS bits are fine, regular cooling helps to temper the metal so the more it's used the better it gets.
To actually achieve a true temper in steel, it has to be held at a steady temperature (between roughly 200°C- 600°C) until the carbon trapped in it diffuses, it is then cooled slowly to a controlled temperature before being quenched to a low temperature. On a standard drill out you will not be tempering but quenching. HSS will withstand higher temperatures without losing its temper (hardness)

 

Most of the HSS drill we buy (keith or Peter might be able to put me correct)today are M2 or M7 types the M35 are HSS drill with 5% cobolt added, cobolt increases heat resistance.

 

M42 (the drills I use) are hss with roughly 8% cobalt, this has the ability to resist wear, increases cutting speeds, resists heat more & are less prone to chipping. Drills made from high speed steel & cobalt are often identified by the letters HSS-Co or M42 & are far from useless & defiantly not worse!

 

 

If the heel is very worn you can forget drilling altogether and cut through the tube on four sides with the edge of your scouring band -- the process is quick, invisible to the customer and far less likely to cause injury.

 

A’ what, can you expand on this, I’m not sure what process you are explaining?

 

And welcome to the forum.

 

Lee

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I find cobalt drill-bits worse than useless. HSS bits are fine, regular cooling helps to temper the metal so the more it's used the better it gets. If the heel is very worn you can forget drilling altogether and cut through the tube on four sides with the edge of your scouring band -- the process is quick, invisible to the customer and far less likely to cause injury.

 

4 statements there that I do not agree with.

 

Cobalt bits worse than useless!!

Cooling tempers metal!!

The more its used the better it gets!!

Scour on a band scourer to lower and the customer will not know!! [-X

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I find cobalt drill-bits worse than useless. HSS bits are fine, regular cooling helps to temper the metal so the more it's used the better it gets. If the heel is very worn you can forget drilling altogether and cut through the tube on four sides with the edge of your scouring band -- the process is quick, invisible to the customer and far less likely to cause injury.

 

4 statements there that I do not agree with.

 

Cobalt bits worse than useless!!

Cooling tempers metal!!

The more its used the better it gets!!

Scour on a band scourer to lower and the customer will not know!! [-X

 

 

Lee, using a Styrup of webbing also gives more control when punching the pin down.

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