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I've never been a fan of "Stick on Soles" "Save a Soles" or whatever you wanna call em, but except they have become a big part of our industry. Most quality manufacturers will put a note with there product recommending that you don't have "SOS's fitted. And in the main I agree. But we accept that it is a service that is required by a lot of customers,

.

 

At what stage would you refuse a "SOS" job, Or would you not refuse at any point.

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At what stage would you refuse a "SOS" job

Stick-on-soles are only fitted to footwear that has a sole (being it leather or rubber) not less than half it's original thickness, any thinner & this product would be refused to be fitted in favour of a main half soling product.

It just ain't professional.

 

It amazes me why someone would purchase a quality leather soled shoe, to then cover it with a thin piece of rubber.

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I think SOS has it's place. Leather is slippery when wet, sounds like an Album :D and porous when first made. Having an SOS fitted correctly, imho, is a worthwhile excercise.

 

As far as covering leather not seeming appropriate is concerned. Leather is more comfortable once worn in and many people prefer the appearance of Quality leather made footwear rather than PU based Clarkes type shoes. So getting a stick on Sole put on after a few weeks wear can often be preferable.

 

Keith

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On Ladies shoes, I have one price for "Soles" then I decide on the merits of each task whether to SOS or replace the sole.

On gents Leathers, if the stitches are worn through I replace the sole, if they arn't stitched its usually about a thrid of ware.

 

I always use the line, "A stick on sole is designed to protect the original sole, not replace it when worn. At this stage they need replacing"

 

Lee

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Replying as a customer my view is thus.

 

Having a very expencive Leather soled shoe (can only afford the one :D ) I want to keep them for as long as possible.

I therefore would prefer an ultra thin stick-a-sole put on to prevent wear to the original sole.

There is also the economic factor to take into consideration as it is an expencive option to have the shoes long soled (would not entertain half soles in leather)when worn.

There is also the comfort and appearace factor as the shoes always (without exception) feel and look different after replacing a sole.

 

However.. I have only ever seen 1 manufacturers product that I would put on my shoes and that was a Pirelli one many years ago. Topy are good but just a bit to thick.

I want flexibality, long life and a method of repelling water which S-A-S do.

Unfortunately many repairers will put on a S-A-S that is far to thick, bring it too far down in the waist, put iron rivets in them at the toes and waist then scour the sole edges therefore removing the original edge profile.

What this also does is give a bloody thick edge appearance to my shoes and results in the sole lifting at the toe as soon as my feet catch the curb edges on pavements.

I want my S-A-S to look invisible from the side view, and not be able to tell that anything extra has been put onto the shoes.

If my soles are worn more than halfway through I would not entertain a S-A-S repair.

 

Now a viewpoint from an ex repairer...

It is very easy to take the moral ground on when or when not should an S-A-S be fitted to a customers shoes/boots, but I agree with xminit here and would advise the customer. If my advice was not taken then I would do the job requested because if I did not then someone else will and I will have lost a customer.

There will always be the customer who wants a cheaper version of what I have to offer as a repairer and I would always try to liase with the customer to achieve their needs, then I would carry out their requests to the best of my ability. I would not refuse to do the job just because I did not agree to the technical nature of the job.

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I agree with most of the posts here, a stick-on-sole is only supposed to be applied to a virtually new sole, to prevent wear, and never to repair them.

 

I think that stick on soles have a place in our business, especially on ladies leather soles, which are so fine and wear out very quickly.

 

As Hugh pointed out though, some repairers scour all round the edge and alter the original shape of the shoe, which is a terrible thing to do!

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what puzzles me every time i listen to customers is when they have bought new shoes worn a short while then had a stick-on-sole, then there is a fault - the heel block pulls away for instance the shop refuses to even pay to have it repaired or refund, saying the 'warranty' is void as they have had a repair done on them.

absolute b******s to me -

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To busy beee I would say this... If a lady (or Tranny) bought in a pair of fine leather soled stilletos for a stick on sole and the sole was 2mm thick, you thenput a stick on sole on top and at least double the thickness.

This makes the shoes look clumped due to there not being a very thin alternative sole to go on top.

 

This brings me to K4mrc... the main reasons for the cop-out policy by retailers is the very reasons I've just mentioned, thick stick on soles putting the shoe slightly out of balance, which then puts stress on the shank and heel fixings.

I would not rule out broken shanks due to exccesive pressure on the press also.

It is however a very grey area and the retailers know that you have not got the expertise to fight your case in an open court should the event progress to this level.

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thick stick on soles putting the shoe slightly out of balance, which then puts stress on the shank and heel fixings.

I would not rule out broken shanks due to exccesive pressure on the press also.

 

but hugh, if one uses a fine sas and hand presses it, the retailers would still use it as a cop out!

even if it is a simple heel repair they wont honour there warranty.

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but hugh, if one uses a fine sas and hand presses it, the retailers would still use it as a cop out!

even if it is a simple heel repair they wont honour there warranty.

 

Quite true but I aint seen a very fine stick on sole for years and how does a Retailer know how you have handles the shoes during repair.

 

Look at it in another way... If you put on a pair of half or through soles and the customer took them to another repairer for stick on soles and later on the leather soles came away, would you accept full responsibilty or would you try to fob the customer off with tales about the stick on sole?

(my bet is that most would blame the other repairer if they were honest).

 

I have been in the fortunate position of examining hundreds of shoes on Retail and manufacturing premises where this very problem has been highlighted and to be truthful I would not have sided with the repairer in any of the situations.

To see some of the abortions carried out in the name of shoe repaires is sole destroying.

Every single pair without exception was fitted with a sole that did not compliment the style or balance of the shoes.

 

But.. if you are of the 1% that can do the job by changing the thickness or having a unique product that suits the shoe then I sympathise with you.

The way around this for the customer is to ask for the shoes to be fitted with a suitable stick on type sole by the retailer, they then are responcible in all aspects of the guarantee and who knows it may be your shop that has the contract to do the work if you are good at working with retailers.

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Hugh-Candoit (ENG) on Sat Oct 25, 2008 6:47 pm

Quite true but I aint seen a very fine stick on sole for years and how does a Retailer know how you have handles the shoes during repair.

 

i picked some carbon lightweight soles from healey at the trade show, very thin and hard wearing.

 

Look at it in another way... If you put on a pair of half or through soles and the customer took them to another repairer for stick on soles and later on the leather soles came away, would you accept full responsibilty or would you try to fob the customer off with tales about the stick on sole?

 

to be honest on this one i usually these days just re-repair things like this even if they are from timpson) unless it is going to cost me loads,

it is better to try to keep customers happy and hope they come back with bigger sales, customers sometimes come with problems from other places and know it was not your work, and if you take time and look after them it will repay in repeat business tenfold!

there is a saying though "you cannot keep every one happy whoever you are" so no matter how good you are - there's always one!

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to be honest on this one i usually these days just re-repair things like this even if they are from timpson) unless it is going to cost me loads,

it is better to try to keep customers happy and hope they come back with bigger sales, customers sometimes come with problems from other places and know it was not your work, and if you take time and look after them it will repay in repeat business tenfold!

there is a saying though "you cannot keep every one happy whoever you are" so no matter how good you are - there's always one!

 

That is the best way to hadle complaints no matter who did them in the 1st place.

Yes there is alway one who is the exception to the norm but dont let them be the yardstick by which you judge others. Happy faces go a long way to repeat business and profitablity.

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  • 1 month later...
Most quality manufacturers will put a note with there product recommending that you don't have "SOS's fitted. And in the main I agree.

 

Planet900 Do you mean that shoemakers say you should not stick them onto leather soles or is it just that the repair leather companies like J&R don't recommend them?

 

I have them on my heavy use shoes that I have for work, where I do a lot of travel to and from the coffee machine and to the bar downsairs but I do not have them on the shoes for formal and smart occasions. Harry.

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Topy Elysee is the best SOS I have come across. They wear extremly well, are only 1.8mm thick and finished correctly, can look half that thickness, suitable for both mens and ladies =D>

 

I would not and have not ever hesitated in having them on my own footwear :wink:

 

I agree they are an excellent product, The reason they are not recommended by some manufacturers is they don't allow the leather to breathe, and alot of the time the leather is so dried out it starts to crack by the time the sos's need replacing.

Nevertheless I have fitted them to some of my shoes and not had a problem, But I don't wear the same shoes every day.

 

Ideally a good pair of leather shoes should be worn one day and left off the next, this gives the moisture time to disburse before the next wear. I believe a good pair of quality leather shoes can last a lifetime if you rotate on a daily basis with other shoes.

If you wear them every day with SOS's on the leather will decay for sure.

 

I wouldn't refuse a customer sos's because of these reasons, but I would recommend the above if prompted.

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The Customer,

 

the reason they recommend Cedar wood shoe trees is because the wood is good at absorbing out any perspiration that has been left in the shoes.

Don't get plastic ones, which whilst cheaper aren't half as good for the shoes!

 

Lee

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Guest darrenbooth

i swear sometimes you guys love to rant.we call them protective soles and i have at least six different types for mens and about five for ladies and i use whats app. for the customer.if its a pair of ballys worn every blue moon then i use the thinnest i have if its a pair of wingtips worn by a 6ft 6 250lb bloke then i,ll show him the thick ones and tell him they,ll last longer and see what he says.i sell cedar trees with cedar heel for about 15 quid from what i gather this is at least half the uk price,why i don.t know as i have to ship mine in from new york

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The Customer,

 

the reason they recommend Cedar wood shoe trees is because the wood is good at absorbing out any perspiration that has been left in the shoes.

Don't get plastic ones, which whilst cheaper aren't half as good for the shoes!

 

Lee

Lee, It never occurred to me about the absorption, thanks. In that case its best I avoid the varnished wooden trees as well. Harry.

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