Jump to content

victor outsole stitcher, any good?


Recommended Posts

Personally I would abvoid the WHB No75 Victor unless you are doing very heavy work that is difficult to get onto a Goodyear. Or of course if it going very very cheap and in good condition. Used correctly they will outlast a goodyear though more difficult to use at first as you break hundreds of expencive needles. Most users do not seem to be able to adjust the Welt guide and Sole groove to enable the Awl & Needle to go in the groove without manipulating the shoe. Most try to push the shoe along and into the machine, hanging onto it like grim death. This of course ensures that the needle aint going to come down in the same hole that the Awl has made and "snap" goes another needle.

Outsole stitchers are made to feed the work along, the machine will do all the work provided that you have set it up right, there is no need for you to grip the shoe and push it to speed things up. Thats where most problems arise from broken parts.

 

Victor for Heavy work... Goodyear for medium to light work.

 

(my personal opinion only of course).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whoever told you there were 2 types was wrong.

 

There were and still are 3 types.

1. Standard

2. WHB

3.K&B

 

All that you will see now from a recon model is the head as the rest is scrapped unlees the machine is sold as is.

 

K&B parts are almost impossible to get hold of, some parts are interchangable but hold hold your breath. This company no longer make Shoe Machinery.

WHB was taken over by Standard so when all parts have dried up thats yer lot so to speak.

Standard are still operating but to be on the safe side ensure that the head on the new model is a Standard one and not one of the others.

 

You will get conraditory remarks that may or may not be correct but stay with the Standard head if purchasing a reconditoned machine, even if you have to wait longer until they have one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are indeed 3 types, but the most commonly sold and therefore available are Standard and K&B :wink:

 

Providing you set your groover tool to the machine, you shouldn't break too many needles. Let the machine do the work and a little practice makes perfect :D Our latest models have a preset speed with direct drive (no clutch) These are much easier to use and therefore save breakages :D

 

As far as availability is concerned, we invaribly have a machine available from stock or within a week or so :? Not sure where you heard of a problem there?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

whoops, got into this a bit late, been checking the scene in hong kong!

 

yes there are 3 types, the whitfield one is best avoided. as for the comments about the kb heads, we took all their stock and are now remanufacturing the more used items like tables, guides etc so parts supply should be no problem. we are also doing this for some standard parts as well as being able to source new parts in the us and denmark. we do this because we recondition both types of head but would not do a whb one, whatever we refurbish we want to be able to support in the future.

 

we are not a very large concern so we do build them to order and can take a few weeks to get one ready but this hasnt been a major problem so far, the heads are stripped to nothing then rebuilt with new rollers etc where needed and this takes a lot of time plus they always get a brand new base, this is where the cost is. as for having one ready in stock there is always the problem of having one then it is the wrong colour.................. we do however sell one we may have ready for a customer if colour isnt a problem and we have time to build another for that customer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

not the castings, no we tend to use old ones and do things to them if we have to

:lol: :lol: The mind boggles Peter!!!

What do you do to the poor sods? :lol:

 

I have welded them with all sorts of rods inc cast and let cool on a bed of hot sand to minimize fast shrinkage, I've plated / drilled tapped them and screwed em together but although they lasted a while they always failed eventually. always on the cating connecting the brake to the top cam. (all going by memory).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

I just have my own question on the goodyear stitcher.In America we wouldn't look at a goodyear stitcher because we would think its obsolete.Landis is pretty much the king here except for the rapid E stitcher.Is your goodyear a different design that the ones here and do you guys get landis stitchers there?

Ray Torcaso

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

I just have my own question on the goodyear stitcher.In America we wouldn't look at a goodyear stitcher because we would think its obsolete.Landis is pretty much the king here except for the rapid E stitcher.Is your goodyear a different design that the ones here and do you guys get landis stitchers there?

Ray Torcaso

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Ray,

 

the goodyear is similar to the landis and some of the parts interchange, in fact if it was soled here in any quantity it would probably be the 4th goodyear. landis is more widely known in continental europe, holland mainly although there are a few in the uk. who so you use for spares? we mainly use harris feierstein

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 years later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...