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Geneva going backwards


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photo has been taken and I will post as soon as I can download it onto the puter, may take a few days. Thanks.

 

You can use the up_button.gif button when making a post to upload your images direct to your post, you wouldn't have seen this before as I have only just altered your user status to allow this feature. hope this helps :wink:

 

Lee

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I will check the switch on monday thanks.

 

Can anyone tell me the sequence of setting the cog in the centre of the photo from the same Geneva. We are having a hit & miss go at getting the machine to stitch without breaking the thread.

208_geneva_694JPG2_1.jpg

 

Never had a Geneva, but I had a similar problem with my DN76.

 

http://www.shoerepairer.info/bb/viewtopic.php?t=824

 

I would imagine it to be a very similar job though,

Hope this helps. :wink:

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the gears on a geneva are keyed and you should not try to move any of them you will have trouble for ever more after (unlike DNs). if you are having trouble with thread breaking the timing of gears is the last thing to look at. it looks nice and clean inside so wax should not affect it. the only thing to check here is that the lock is working - the plates with the nut on top right of pic. when the needle is going up towards the shuttle the thread should pull through fairly easily when the needle is going down again the thread should be locked, if not loosen the nut, screw the plates clockwise half a tuen, tighten the nut and try again. the other things to check are you have a good quality nylon thread on machine. have you tried changing the whirel? also the cap that covers the whirl quite often gets little nicks in it that you cannot see, take it off get some fine emery paper tear it in a thin strip, pass through the hole and clean the inside of the hole with it. is the thread snapping in the same place on the shoe or randomly? if it is randomly every few stitches it is a sign of a worn whirl, if it is always more or less the same point on a shoe it is the cap. it is unusual to have any other causes but then again ive never heard of a geneva going either way when you turn it on! :?

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the other thing to check (just remembered) is does the thread drop freely from the shuttle when the needle is coming down or does it 'ping' if it pings then take the shuttle apart, clan and lubricate it the stick it back together again. it is amazing how much wax builds up over time off the nylon threads and makes a big difference to the working of a geneva

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the gears on a geneva are keyed and you should not try to move any of them you will have trouble for ever more after (unlike DNs). if you are having trouble with thread breaking the timing of gears is the last thing to look at. it looks nice and clean inside so wax should not affect it. the only thing to check here is that the lock is working - the plates with the nut on top right of pic. when the needle is going up towards the shuttle the thread should pull through fairly easily when the needle is going down again the thread should be locked, if not loosen the nut, screw the plates clockwise half a tuen, tighten the nut and try again. the other things to check are you have a good quality nylon thread on machine. have you tried changing the whirel? also the cap that covers the whirl quite often gets little nicks in it that you cannot see, take it off get some fine emery paper tear it in a thin strip, pass through the hole and clean the inside of the hole with it. is the thread snapping in the same place on the shoe or randomly? if it is randomly every few stitches it is a sign of a worn whirl, if it is always more or less the same point on a shoe it is the cap. it is unusual to have any other causes but then again ive never heard of a geneva going either way when you turn it on! :?

 

Thats what the forums all about... Nice one Peter :wink:

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Keith, While I totally agree on the Lube, I tell folk that WD40 is not a lubricant, rather a water dispersant. 3in1 spray with PTFE is brill.

 

Have a freind who used to service Rolls engines and He nearly bit my head off when I told him that I used WD40 as an oil.

 

I now use it as a cleaner then use oil afterwards, seen folk use WD for lubricating cams on goodyears, now it aint thick enough for that.

Good product though, used for what it was intended.

 

Fetches a lot off stains/marks off things

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I know many who just use WD40, swear by it :shock:

 

I used gearbox oil on the Cams and engine oil on the rest of a Goodyear.

So much quieter and smoother running, sprayed it liberally on Sat night and left old towels on the table for the excess to get caught in. Lifted the cover on Monday and stood to one side with my foot on the pedal and gradually let it build up to full speed. Still a superb machine 45 years on, and still getting tender loving care by the new user who's dad was the Rolls mechanic.

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I now know the answer to the original question.

 

The Geneva has been taken over by aliens from the Goon Show,

 

Altogether now!!!

 

I'm going backwards for Christmas.

 

Talking of Xmas, it is rumoured that UK900 has just bought his wife a pair of 2 carrat diamond earrings for xmas. (is it true) My wife says she also wants something sparkly for xmas so I've got her a glow worm on a stick.

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Uncle John, just looked at your profile, whist checking other members, and asked my insider 8) Timpson chap if he new an Uncle John, and he put the name John Higgs to you, I remember reading your name in the book Dear James, and have just found out the paragraph which said

 

"Several ideas found on shop visits have had a profound effect on our business. In 1990, I saw that the manager of our Cheadle shop, John Higgs, was displaying a whole line of leather shoes on his rack above the machinery. He repaired more leather-soled shoes than anyone else in the business and his shop was in a small suburb of Manchester. Within a year, every branch had a similar display of leather shoes. In the next eight years, our leather business quadrupled."

 

is this really you? if so, we are not worthy! and welcome to the land of the shoe repairer forum!

 

Lee

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