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Brought my DN76 in 1997 reconditoned, Never had a problem with it. Till today, first thing this morning my son took a pair of mocs in the back to blake.. Bang bang bang bang.....SSSSTTOP.

to late.. first of all I thought the pin & wryle had gone, as it was all out of time.

Changed them, but no good. the bloody wyrle wasn't even turning.

So I started a process of illimination. off came the horn and the gears that acompany,

Having never stripped a DN76 down before, and couldn't find the manual.

It wasn't till I dragged the thing away from the wall and took the back off that I found the problem.

The nut had come off the gear which connects to the hand wheel & the head of the machine & the horn.(if that makes sense)

Great, I'll just pop it back on and away we go... No it aint that easy, the timing is a complete bugger without the hand book.

I managed to work it out in the end, as you'd never get it right just guessing.

I worked it out by setting the machine in the position when the bottom thread lock's to give the tention to pull down the loop, then turned the gear by hand to the right posistion. hey presto. working a treat.

 

How ever is there an easyier way of setting this timing if it happen's again.

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If it had happened to you you'd have had to call out an engineer :lol: :lol:

 

...or call me,

 

I've just serviced my Bambi Air compressor this morning

Had a blockage between the pump & tank, turns out to be the non-return valve on the tank inlet opposite the burst valve, 'twas a bit gungy inside , but it's all good now

I'm always amazed just how much water collects in the tank... 15lt tank = 14lt air & 1lt water, now it's holding a full 15lt of air

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Try letting the air out nightly Tel, compressed air = water as a by product :wink:

 

Acouple of years back, a customer was telling me about his compressor not working to well in his shop while I was there. After taking out about 3 pints of oil contaminated water, it worked perfectly :shock:

 

Mind you, he had to have some valves changed shortly after as the water buggered up the seals on the valves due to the contamination, silly boy :wink:

 

Keith

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Uk900, you have found the only way to re time a 76. what might help though is where the gear is at the end of the shaft from top to bottom there are 2 nuts underneath it as well as a grub screw in the side of the gear. make sure you tighten the first nut only slightly more than finger tight then lock the second one to this. hopefully it wont come undone again afterwards

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Uk900, you have found the only way to re time a 76. what might help though is where the gear is at the end of the shaft from top to bottom there are 2 nuts underneath it as well as a grub screw in the side of the gear. make sure you tighten the first nut only slightly more than finger tight then lock the second one to this. hopefully it wont come undone again afterwards

 

It did come undone again :evil:

I thought at the time there should have been a locking nut, but I looked under the machine to see if it had fallen off, but it wasn't there.

I have however put one on. :wink:

This time though I it was a pig to get the timing right.

I would have thought some simple markings on the gears/wheels would have been a simple solution to this pig of a job :wink: :?

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Just a matter of punching 2 marks on opposing gears, when say the needle is at the top of the stroke. As you say though it is just a thought in this instance and may not be feasable in this case. Tried it on a No75 Victor some years ago and could not make a mark on the steel gearing , must have been made of diamond coated tungsten.

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the theory of marking the gears is good but one of the gears in discussion here is inside the machine and only accessible by stripping the machine completely. the way uk900 timed was correct, you set the lock position by sight or feel (this is driven by the inside gear) and then bring the head (needle bar) to the correct point. then you bring the gears together and lock them.

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  • 1 month later...
the theory of marking the gears is good but one of the gears in discussion here is inside the machine and only accessible by stripping the machine completely. the way uk900 timed was correct, you set the lock position by sight or feel (this is driven by the inside gear) and then bring the head (needle bar) to the correct point. then you bring the gears together and lock them.

 

Unusual for uk900 to be right :wink:

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