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Redundancy


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The fashion change has already started to have an impact in some areas.

They could have been overstaffed for the last year, or more than likely cutting out the bad wood so the tree can grow.

 

Maybe they were trades folk who could not move with the times, some of the multiples were guilty of this and must now find themselve short of the high skills required to complete the repair in the branch. (my thought would have been to stick them in a back room on a bench and finisher, or get them together in an area centre offering specialised skills to that area) I just hate to see good traditional skills being lost forever.

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[1984 I was made redundant due to lack of work in a shoe repair factory.

 

Doing a self analytical job on yourself, why was it that you got made redundant. How many staff were in employment in that workplace?

 

Serious answer please as I am interested in this, plus 84 did not see any great change in fashion, the changes had alread happened.

Is there a reason that you can remember that lead up to the situation?

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Well we had to rely on 90% of contract work from all over the midlands and as far as I remember it was mainly due to a change in customer needs rather than fashion, ie while you waits or same day repairs. This was something that we did not offer. We did have a shop but it was way off the beaten track with very little footfall.

Hope this helps Hugh.

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Yes, that was informative, the answer was totally different from what I expected.

I had forgoten about the units in the backwaters that served the agents/retail shops and relied totally on this cycle of events, once while-u-wait or while-u-shop came into being then a fair number of these establishments went out of business. So of them with high street locations survived to tell the tale but the change from working at a bench in a back room or cellar to being at full frontal with the customer did not go down too well with the stalwarts. I still have a photo of myself sitting at the bench in a cellar(rats running along an open interior gutter) at luchtime playing cards and fag hanging out of my lips, fish & chip papers and sandwich box on the bench. I was 18 at the time and working in North Wales.

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Almost forgot what it was like to have a 1 hour lunch break, endless mugs of stewed tea and chips out of newspaper. Oh and losing my spare cash to the wise old benchmen who I'm sure cheated me at 3 card brag.

No customers to mither you, no kids with getto boxes, just a nice relaxing hour before mayhem when the buzzer sounded for 2 o'clock.

 

Today a quick sandwich thrown down your throat (if your are lucky) and a cup of something going cold in the back or under the counter while you serve the lunchtime brigade of "I want it now" has to be the norm in most establishments. Want a fag!! no chance, even if you get the chance it usually burns away before you have had the chance of a few puffs.

I feel sorry for those having to go and stand outside in the "Leper" shelter of some companies, braving the bitter cold winds and the rain. Passive smoking,what a laugh, more smoke comes off Rubber being scoured.

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Yes, that was informative, the answer was totally different from what I expected.

I had forgoten about the units in the backwaters that served the agents/retail shops and relied totally on this cycle of events, once while-u-wait or while-u-shop came into being then a fair number of these establishments went out of business. So of them with high street locations survived to tell the tale but the change from working at a bench in a back room or cellar to being at full frontal with the customer did not go down too well with the stalwarts. I still have a photo of myself sitting at the bench in a cellar(rats running along an open interior gutter) at luchtime playing cards and fag hanging out of my lips, fish & chip papers and sandwich box on the bench. I was 18 at the time and working in North Wales.

 

Those were the days, racks and racks of shoe's with the boss fitting all the work up and then hovering round while it got done.

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