Jump to content

February 2006 - health & safety


Do you actively comply to health and safety  

9 members have voted

You do not have permission to vote in this poll, or see the poll results. Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

Recommended Posts

With so many posts about health and safety, including dust extraction, noise electrical safety & Air compressor servicing.

 

Do you apart from emptying out water from the compressor and emptying the dust from the machine, actively comply to H&S?

 

For example do you have data safety sheet for your glues, have ear defenders readily available? etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've taken in the last 6 months or so (following a near incident) to wearing safety glasses all the time whilst I'm doing shoe repairs - the amount of bits that fly off the machine, it's just too much of a risk!

I have always worn safety specs whilst cutting keys.

 

I have copies of data sheets for all glues etc. I keep, and a hazardous materials cupboard to keep them in.

 

Ear plugs - I tried the foam ones which were great, really cut down the noise, but when I came to talk to customers I just couldn't hear them, so gave up!

 

I'm sure there's always more that you can do with regard to H&S, but at the moment I'm happy that I'm doing enough to protect myself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Raymate

we get a visit every year or two from hsa

they point out a couple of things we need i think just to justify their jobs and show they are doing something

we do what they suggest they come back next time see we have done what they asked and give us another coupe of things to do

complying to their requests means that on the whole they leave us alone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Does that mean that the one man band should ignore his own safety because he doesn't employ staff :shock:

 

Surely, as the owner of the business and generally, the future of it, your health is MORE important than anyone's?

 

Adhesive fumes, dust, swarf amongst others, are a risk to your Health and Safety, regardless of position within the business and should be regarded in that way imo. There are too many repaires, old, ex trade and retired, including myself, with hearing/breathing problems. Why suffer?

 

I talk to many repairers who will buy the cheapest machine available, generally second hand, based on the fact that it will 'do the job' and it's cheap!!

 

Pure folly, you should consider all aspects of your future when making machinery purchases, finishers, band scourers, key machines, etc, to make sure you are buying something that can assist you in your efforts to comply with HSE requirments, for YOUR sake, as well as your customers and any staff you employ.

 

Keith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hmmm think you will find h&s applies to everyone as poor maintenance leading to accidents could affect customers as well as operators. do you risk assess your shelving and displays for instance, what if they are not properly attached to the wall? do you have loose floor tiles in customer area. these are all areas to consider.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How many of you have a perspex or other sheild between the customer and the key machines. Flying swarf is omni-directional, plus how many customers put their hands over the counter to eplain something on the key or key ring while the machine is in motion!! oops there goes a finger.

"Sorry your sleeve got caught in the machinery, just take your hand in this plastic repairs bag to the Hospital my Patcher is playing up"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hugh, one might ask why you would place a key cutting machine so close to where the public can observe the process. as I said, common sense should prevail, a simple risk assessment should help you place the machines in a safer envoirement. I don't believe it's a science at all, but appreciate that there may have to be some compromises over space.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hugh, one might ask why you would place a key cutting machine so close to where the public can observe the process. as I said, common sense should prevail, a simple risk assessment should help you place the machines in a safer envoirement. I don't believe it's a science at all, but appreciate that there may have to be some compromises over space.

 

 

Having worked for the two major multiples I have seen some cases where the key machines are within touching distance of the public, Quite alarming when you think about it, I use to warn people about flying swarf and ask them to take a step back.

 

Another one to watch is when you hand over a stilletto heel which has just been repaired wuw with a metal tip, they can get VERY HOT and burn fingers if not aware.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

a disclaimer is a dodgy way to go. if you are admitting you have dangerous areas you will not have a leg to stand on if anything happened. a warning sign prohibitting entry from certain areas and barriers should do it. as with everything nowadays do as much as you can but as mentioned common sense is not allowed.

H&S is a minefield because of the ease/stupitidy of going to sourt for compensation. if you are worried about your shop try being a voluntary first aider - for every hour of duty we do there are approx 4 hours of meetings behind the scenes where everything has to be documented and some paperwork is stored for up to 25 years.......................................................................................

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i am a one man band,and on my last hsa inspection ,i was told to get a

 

a cabinet to keep the toilet roll in.i have an outside toilet and the

 

inspector said the toilet roll was damp.i have had several inspections

 

each visit is carried out by two people,one is an inspector and the other is

 

an enforcer :?:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, if we all had the hindsight of common sence, no accidents would ever happen.

Oh, if we all had enough room to have a dedicated area to each machine, isolated from the public and a Loo with warm sterile bog rolls.

 

Well yes we can, take a step back 30 years and have the shop as a reception area only, all the work is done in the back or sent away.

(maybe we are moving already towards this situation).

 

To keep yer bog rolls from going damp with the opportunity for ones finger to pop through, store them in easy close freezer bags, the type with a zip closure. Damp rolls are contaminated by airborne bacteria and are unsuitable for soaking the fat off Chips!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...