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cowers lane 583

uncollected repairs

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Dealing with a "customer complaint" this morning. ( she said she left between 2-6 watches with me back in august 2014. No paperwork of course! Not really a complaint in my book, she hasn't a leg to stand on.)

Got me to ponder what is the actual legal time limit for retaining repairs. My repair receipts say I will keep uncollected repairs for 3 months. I actually keep inexpensive watches (under 100) and shoes for a year , watches up to 300 for a couple of years ( never happened) and expensive watches for seven years ( 2 gold watches, seven years because I read it once somewhere.)

Anyone has any thoughts?

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There is no set time limit as far as I am aware. As long as you keep the items for a 'reasonable' amount of time then the customer won't have a leg to stand on. 13/14 months is more than a reasonable amount of time in my opinion.

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Ring and speak to you local trading standards.

 

As far as i remember you are not allowed to dispose of any repair until you have tried to communicate with the customer in writing.

 

We don't have this problem as we take for all jobs when they come in so they can leave them for 50 years if needed. Funnily enough NOTHING gets left anymore and i mean NOTHING amazing

how paying for something makes you remember to collect it.

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As far as i remember you are not allowed to dispose of any repair until you have tried to communicate with the customer in writing.

 

I've also heard this, but surely I'm not the only one who doesn't take contact details for minor repairs, that should be really collected within a day or so. This would take too much time.

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As far as i remember you are not allowed to dispose of any repair until you have tried to communicate with the customer in writing.

 

I've also heard this, but surely I'm not the only one who doesn't take contact details for minor repairs, that should be really collected within a day or so. This would take too much time.

 

All well and good but if any customer returns with a reciept for a repair that you have disposed of, then you are liable for replacing the item with a brand new replacement.

 

So not only did you not get paid for your repairs but you could also lose more money having to replace the missing repair.

 

Take in advance for your repairs and watch every item disapear, takes a while but eventually your customers will accept this as a normal practice. If you don't have card facilities now will be

the time to invest in them and the money saved for unclaimed repairs will pay for it. Most customers will say i haven't any cash but they ALL have cards.

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All well and good but if any customer returns with a reciept for a repair that you have disposed of, then you are liable for replacing the item with a brand new replacement.

 

So not only did you not get paid for your repairs but you could also lose more money having to replace the missing repair.

 

Take in advance for your repairs and watch every item disapear, takes a while but eventually your customers will accept this as a normal practice. If you don't have card facilities now will be

the time to invest in them and the money saved for unclaimed repairs will pay for it. Most customers will say i haven't any cash but they ALL have cards.

Do the big companies also do this? And if a customer brings something in and cannot pay - do you still take them in?

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Do the big companies also do this? And if a customer brings something in and cannot pay - do you still take them in?

If a customer has no money, we take the repair in and tell them we will not start the job until it is paid for. We did have a couple of customers walk out when we first introduced it but that was over 8

years ago and now most customers understand why we had to do it and dont have a problem with paying in advance.

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If a customer has no money, we take the repair in and tell them we will not start the job until it is paid for. We did have a couple of customers walk out when we first introduced it but that was over 8

years ago and now most customers understand why we had to do it and dont have a problem with paying in advance.

Exactly what we do , as stated 4 posts above.

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I believe a notice in your window giving prior notice of disposal is sufficient. A 3 month time limit will cover you. As long as you've taken all reasonable steps to contact the customer's. I don't take phone numbers or address so for me this is sufficient, according to trading standards.

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I really like the sign idea. Will implement immediately. Can see the benefits of full payment upfront, but it's not for me. Apart from sales over £20/25. Left repairs are not a big problem in my shop, however if the matter did arise and a customer came in for a repair after I had disposed of it, then she/he would have to take me to small claim court.

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  • The Torts (Interference with Goods) Act 1977 provisions apply any time after the goods are ready for collection, subject to any terms imposed at the time the goods were left with you for repair.

     

    If you are in possession of a customer's goods and he/she is under an obligation to collect them (e.g. because you have repaired the goods for the customer), you are entitled to sell the goods if they remain uncollected and are not otherwise the subject of a dispute. Before doing so, you must satisfy two conditions:

     

    1. You must first send the owner of the goods written notice of:

  • their obligation to collect the goods;
  • details of the goods to be collected and the address at which they are held;
  • your name and address;
  • details of any sum of money owing in respect of the goods at the time the notice is sent (e.g. repair charges, storage costs).

     

    This notice may be delivered direct to the owner, left at his proper address or posted to it. The 'proper address' means:

  • in the case of a limited or public limited company, the registered office or principal office;
  • in any other case, the last known address of the owner.

     

    2. If the notice does not result in collection of the goods, you must send the owner, by recorded delivery post or registered letter:

  • the same information as in the notice above, plus
  • notice of your intention to sell the goods if they remain uncollected, and the date of the intended sale.

     

    The period between the issue of the second notice and the date of intended sale must be reasonably sufficient for the owner to reclaim the goods. If any money is owed to you, this period must be at least three months.

     

    If the owner still does not collect the goods by the date stated in your second notice, you can sell them. You must give the proceeds of the sale to the owner of the goods, but you are entitled to keep any money owed to you, including the cost of the sale (e.g. advertising).

     

    If the owner of the goods is not at the proper address, you can still go ahead with the sale after you have taken reasonable, unsuccessful, steps to trace him/her.

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Still no specifics on length of time. Seems to be aimed at higher value repairs and long term repairs, not same day/ next day repairs.

Will follow this for higher value repairs, anything over £200. Anything less going to keep for maybe two years. ( cheap stuff will go in the bin after a year) If a customer comes back after this I really do fancy my chances In court. ( not that most customers would bother for that amount.) My shop is only about ten foot by twelve foot.

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Take the money up front. I've being doing this for years now since I got fed up of shelves of uncollected repairs. I get left with nothing anymore..........I tell a lie. I have one pair of ladies boots to have heels. She insisted on not paying..............still here.

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Take the money up front./quote]

 

Before this thread never had a problem with uncollected shoe repairs. Since this thread I now have at least 5. All " expensive" resoling

jobs. Partially Taking your advise. Full payment up front on all shoe repairs over £20 from now on.

 

Had a customer wanting to collect two watches from last year today. I said too late, donated to oxfam. She went on and on about although they weren't expensive, they had a lot of sentimental value. Shouldn't leave them for over a year then!

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I took a bit of delight with an order recently. I had a lady bring in 8 watches and never collect them. But I remembered her car.

eventually after 2 1/2 years I spotted her out and about.

embarrassed her in front of who she was with and she duly collected.

after payment she noticed two of the watches weren't working........

I then explained the guarantee was from the date of fitting.

bad luck bitch. You paid for two flat batteries......karma restored.

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E.g you hire a man and a van. But three weeks later you notice a damaged ornament...... surely it is very probable ( and this would be "the man"'s explanation) is you've broken it in the last two and half weeks.

Interesting that they are saying notices on display don't really carry any legal weight.

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They say a notice "may not be necessarily true." A notice cannot  absolve you of your legal responsibilities, but, failure to show a notice to inform the customers of your legal terms of contract can be termed negligence.

 

E.g you hire a man and a van. But three weeks later you notice a damaged ornament...... surely it is very probable ( and this would be "the man"'s explanation) is you've broken it in the last two and half weeks.
Interesting that they are saying notices on display don't really carry any legal weight.

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after loads of deliberating on this and assessing left repairs - we are not changing to pre-pay, this is because we have just thrown away some 15 pairs of customers shoes that had not been collected from 1/1/15 - total of repairing cost of materials some £30!

I have decided that it is not broke this system we have in place and it is working and with extra competition in this area am going to leave it as it is and not risk upsetting them.

We are however trialing asking up front payment with a split of around 50 percent so far paying upfront, early days yet to rejoice but so far not a problem.

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